Matcha White Chocolate Cake Pops: Mold vs. Traditional Method

Matcha and White Chocolate Cake Pops 9

Second post of Green Week! If you hadn’t realized it yet, I’m obsessed with the flavor of matcha. Of course, I had to do a matcha recipe for St. Patrick’s Day. Matcha cake paired with matcha-tinted white chocolate and, of course, sprinkles is an excellent way to celebrate the holiday. Turn it into cake pops makes it an easy-to-handle-while-partying treat. This recipe includes two methods: one using a silicone cake pop mold and one using a muffin tin. If you’ve been considering purchasing a cake pop mold, read this first to make an educated purchasing decision!

Linked on Saucy Saturdays!

Matcha and White Chocolate Cake Pops 1

I recently got an excellent deal on several silicone molds from Amazon. I have heart, stars and even dinosaurs! I’m very excited! I also picked up a Pepto-Bismol pink two piece mold specifically for making cake pops. It has 20 semi-circular cups on top and bottom. The top piece has tiny holes in each cup to stick the cake pops in to set. The pieces snap together very well due thanks to a lip around the edge of both pieces. I had several concerns about using this mold for the first. I’ll list them below in the order they were resolved (for better or worse!).

  1. Stability of mold during transport and baking

Because the mold is made of silicone, it is fairly flimsy and hard to handle once filled with batter. I put it on a metal baking sheet to move it to and from the oven more easily.

Matcha and White Chocolate Cake Pops 3

  1. Spillover during baking

There was no spillage with the recipe I used. I suppose, even if there was, the mold is nonstick so it should be pretty easy to clean. This is also another potential reason to bake with the mold on a baking sheet.

Matcha and White Chocolate Cake Pops 2

  1. Evenness of baking

The bottoms of my cake balls were noticeably darker and more done than the tops. I considered flipping the mold halfway through the bake time but the tiny holes in the top of the mold make this not so doable. Because recipes are not really written for this type of pan, it is difficult to know what bake time to use. I stuck with a time similar to that of a mini cupcake recipe. (You can see the bottoms in my dipping pics below.)

Matcha and White Chocolate Cake Pops 4

  1. Flavor and moisture level compared to traditional method

This was the biggest concern and the biggest disappointment! A traditional cake pop recipe has you combine cake crumbs with frosting or filling so you get all the flavor of a slice of cake without the hassle. Because this mold creates already circular cake bits, there is no need to add frosting. Unfortunately, this recipe did not benefit from the lack of extra frosting. The mold pops were drier and less flavorful than the traditional pops.

  1. Stability of cake pop holder part of mold

The top half of this mold has tiny holes in the bottom of each cup so that you can place the lollipop stick into them and let the cake pop coating set standing up. The holes were so small that the sticks were really hard to fit into them. Plus, the flimsiness of the silicone made this feature mostly unusable. I had to weight the center of the mold in order to get any pops to stay. Even then, the pops leaned over disconcertingly far.

Matcha and White Chocolate Cake Pops 8

So what’s the verdict? While the mold pops were more consistently pretty and quicker and easier to bake, they just didn’t live up to the flavor and texture of the traditional method pops. I’m not giving up on the mold though! I think the results could be good with a richer cake recipe or maybe a brownie pop recipe. Mmm… Brownies…

Green Week Features!

A-bowl-of-traditional-Irish-potato-soup Traditional Irish Potato Soup from Irish American Mom

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Matcha Matcha Chip Crisps 7 Matcha Matcha Chip Crisps from SweetMeets

Matcha White Chocolate Cake Pops

  • Servings: 20 cake pops
  • Time: 60 minutes
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients:

¾ cup sugar

4 tablespoons butter, melted

2 eggs, beaten

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

2/3 cup all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon matcha green tea powder

1 teaspoon baking powder

½ teaspoon salt

12 oz white chocolate melting wafers (You’ll need double this if you aren’t using the mold.)

2 tablespoons matcha (You’ll need double this if you aren’t using the mold.)

20 lollipop sticks

Holiday appropriate sprinkles

Directions (Baking with Mold):

Preheat oven to 350° F.

Place holeless side of mold on baking sheet.

Cream together sugar and butter.

Add eggs and vanilla.

In a separate bowl, whisk together flour, 1 tablespoon matcha, baking powder and salt.

Mix in sugar mixture.

Fill holeless side of mold with batter. (Fill cups all the way to the top.)

Top with hole-having side of mold.

Bake 18-20 minutes.

Remove mold to wire rack to cool.

Melt white chocolate in microwave in 30-second intervals, stirring after each.

Mix in remaining 2 tablespoons matcha until smooth.

Place 1 completely cooled cake ball onto lollipop stick.

Dip cake ball into chocolate mixture, covering completely.

Top with sprinkles.

Place lollipop stick into tiny holes in the top of the mold to set.

Repeat with remaining pops.

But wait! I don’t have that fancy Pepto-Bismol thing!

Fear not, traveler! I also tested this recipe using the traditional, moldless cake pop method! I had enough batter leftover after filling the mold to make 2 cupcakes. I was very happy it made 2 because I was afraid just 1 cupcake might feel like a sad, lonely freak…

Directions (Baking without Mold):

Preheat oven to 350° F.

Grease or line muffin tin with papers.

Cream together sugar and butter.

Add eggs and vanilla.

In a separate bowl, whisk together flour, 1 tablespoon matcha, baking powder and salt.

Mix in sugar mixture.

Spoon batter into prepared muffin cups.

Bake 18-20 minutes.

Remove cupcakes to wire rack to cool.

Once cool, crumble cupcakes in large bowl.

Melt 12 oz white chocolate in microwave in 30-second intervals, stirring after each.

Mix in 2 tablespoons matcha until smooth.

Add chocolate mixture to cake crumbs, mixing with hand until well-combined.

Melt additional 12 oz white chocolate in microwave in 30-second intervals, stirring after each.

Mix in additional 2 tablespoons matcha until smooth.

Place 1 cake ball onto lollipop stick.

Dip cake ball into chocolate mixture, covering completely.

Top with sprinkles.

Place pop onto parchment paper to set. (The chocolate filling will make these too heavy to stand up straight while drying.)

Repeat with remaining pops.

9 thoughts on “Matcha White Chocolate Cake Pops: Mold vs. Traditional Method

  1. Oh my cake pops, they look wonderful. I like the molds, You know you could use those with the cake/buttercream mixture just to get them perfectly round. I like that you can use it as a stand as well. Very nice and love the matcha.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. For what it’s worth, I don’t think the little holes in the top are designed for putting a stick into so the coating can harden. I think the holes are to allow for the escape of excess batter if you accidentally put in too much and it over-rises during baking. So it’s not really the silicone pan’s fault that the sticks tipped over… 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s a fair point! Certainly they are necessary for ventilation. But the Amazon page and freebie reviews for it do show it being used as a stand so I had to give it a shot. Thanks for reading!

      Like

  3. Pingback: Brownie Pops + National Cake Pop Day | Sweet Meets Bake Shop

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